Bloody shovel

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We need a new religion, 3

Isegoria has been running a series of posts quoting John Glubb’s The Fate of Empires. It’s a great book, short and to the point. Not exactly erudite and full of data, but the patterns he points out are very interesting, even though his analysis is not quite consistent.

I also found interesting his chapter on religion, which agrees on some old idea of mine:

 

In due course, selfishness permeated the community, the coherence of which was weakened until disintegration was threatened. Then, as we have seen, came the period of pessimism with the accompanying spirit of frivolity and sensual indulgence, by- products of despair. It was inevitable at such times that men should look back yearningly to the days of ‘religion’, when the spirit of self-sacrifice was still strong enough to make men ready to give and to serve, rather than to snatch.

But while despair might permeate the greater part of the nation, others achieved a new realisation of the fact that only readiness for self-sacrifice could enable a community to survive. Some of the greatest saints in history lived in times of national decadence, raising the banner of duty and service against the flood of depravity and despair.

In this manner, at the height of vice and frivolity the seeds of religious revival are quietly sown. After, perhaps, several generations (or even centuries) of suffering, the impoverished nation has been purged of its selfishness and its love of money, religion regains its sway and a new era sets in. ‘It is good for me that I have been afflicted,’ said the psalmist, ‘that I might learn Thy Statutes.’

 

I’d say we need renewal, and not yet another revival, but the train of thought is similar.

Glubb has an interesting proposal:

If the present writer were a millionaire, he would try to establish in some university or other a department dedicated solely to the study of the rhythm of the rise and fall of powerful nations throughout the world. History goes back only some 3,000 years, because before that period writing was not sufficiently widespread to allow of the survival of detailed records. But within that period, the number of empires available for study is very great.

At the commencement of this essay, the names of eleven such empires were listed, but these included only the Middle East and the modern nations of the West. India, China and Southern America were not included, because the writer knows nothing about them. A school founded to study the rise and fall of empires would probably find at least twenty-four great powers available for dissection and analysis.

The task would not be an easy one, if indeed the net were cast so wide as to cover virtually all the world’s great nations in 3,000 years. The knowledge of language alone, to enable detailed investigations to be pursued, would present a formidable obstacle.

He is also not alone with this idea; many out there are studying this topic, and histories on non-western Civilizations are much easier to find today. At the very least an attempt to map Glubb’s theory of historical stages with the dynastic cycles in China shouldn’t be too hard.

 

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8 responses to “We need a new religion, 3

  1. Candide III July 7, 2014 at 19:37

    Do you know an old book by a J. D. Unwin called “Sex and Culture”? Here’s jim’s sorta review. I believe somebody else in the reactosphere did a more substantial review quite a while ago, but I couldn’t find it.

  2. Pingback: We need a new religion, 3 | Reaction Times

  3. Sam September 8, 2014 at 23:47

    If your interested in rise and fall of Empires you might like this,

    “An Inquiry into the Permanent Causes of the Decline and Fall of Powerful and Wealthy Nations.
    Designed To Shew How The Prosperity Of The British Empire
    May Be Prolonged” by William Playfair.

    http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/16575?msg=welcome_stranger

  4. Pingback: Secession | Bloody shovel

  5. AT May 16, 2016 at 02:17

    That first quote seems straight out of Oswald Spengler “The Decline of the West”
    I would wager that Glubb read Spengler and tried to develop his own thoughts upon it.

  6. Pingback: The balance of the natural and social world | Bloody shovel

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