Bloody shovel

Don't call it a spade

Burma’s dead, long live Burma.

Says Thrasymachos that he’s fascinated with Walter Russel Mead. I must admit to share some of the fascination. It’s like watching a train wreck. I can’t help admiring the mess, and wondering how each piece of broken steel is entwined to the other. Thinking how on hell did the toilet end up between rows 11 and 12, surprisingly keeping its shape intact.

A good source of reactionary recruits is a sober analysis of recent foreign policy. Of Moldbug’s Cathedral, perhaps the most conspicuous part is the US State Department. National policy is subject to many emotional narratives and historical constraints that, on the whole, are quite understandable and acceptable at face-value. But any careful look at, say, US foreign policy before and after WW2, and a good perusal at contemporary sources is the fastest way to lose it. The sheer madness of it all shows that Progressives are just out of their minds.

And they still are, which also proves the Cathedral is still the same animal. The fact that a homo US ambassador was publicly murdered on the streets of Benghazi should be proof enough. But there’s always more. Going back to Mr. Mead, he likes to focus on those topics with more potential for bringing good news, say, 3D printing, or autonomous cars, or East Asian policy. A recent news hotspot is, of course, Myanmar.

See this masterpiece of foreign policy journalism, this awesome sentence destined to be studied in all International Relations undergrad courses for posterity.

Good news from Burma: the ethnic Mon minority rallied on Tuesday without any of the violent pushback from the central authorities that characterized similar expressions of democracy in the old days.

The headline, eloquent enough is: As Burma Opens, Its Minorities Seek Rights, Independence. Which is to say, as Burma Opens, Burma Disappears. Or, as Burma Opens, the Burmese lose their country. But that’s Good News! It doesn’t come to WRM that some things are just not meant to be opened.

I blogged before about how Myanmar is fucked for good. In the Junta times, the Chinese were taking over everything, and topping it with outright demographic invasion. As well as the Junta was having it, they didn’t want to be eaten up by the Chinese, and in a desperate measure they surrendered to the USG, thinking they’d at least maintain control of their nation. Hah. As bad as the Chinese political system is, one thing they manage quite well is ethnic policy. Ethnic minorities in China are allowed to keep their outward identity, but the economic incentives are set up so you’d better speak Chinese and behave Han if you want to eat more than sticky rice once a day. It goes without saying that hardcore religious groups (Tibetans and Uyghurs) aside, all other minorities have lost 95% of what makes them distinct.

But now Myanmar is the bitch of the International Community, so it has to abide by USG norms. Which means that any self-styled nation, tribe fetish or mental diseased group gets immediate rights to their own land, sovereignty AND an eternal flow of subsidies to compensate for the psychological distress caused by them having a bigger, better organised, more coherent neighbour. See, the Cathedral’s ethnic policy doesn’t encourage ethnogenesis or discourage it either, it just freezes it on time, and then applies the equality principle. Kinda like their view of evolution. They’re not against it, they just want it to stop. Now. Retroactively if possible.

Let it be said that I have no particular goodwill towards the Bamar people. I think it’s cool that the Mon (the original inhabitants of all continental SEA) are still around, and if anything I’d push for Shan state to be given back to Thailand. I just think it’s not really fair that just because the Bamar got into imperialism just 200 years later, now they have to lose their country. The Thais got into that business just at the right timing to completely assimilate the Mon and any other annoying tribes before British and American busybodies had time to get in the frontier, convert the tribes to Christianity and encourage guerilla war against the stronger tribes in the lowlands.

What is there to gain? What does the world gain in giving sovereignty  to the Kachin? Or the Rohingya? The Kayan women deform their necks with metal rings to avoid rape and capture from neighbouring (stronger) tribes. A desperate attempt to cling to their tribal identity.  Methinks they’d be better off by assimilating to the majority. But God forbid they are coerced into anything!!

Of course the Cathedral per se doesn’t have a master plan that includes Mon autonomy and Rohingya independence, although George Soros probably has a good plan to profit on any contingency. But the only real plan is the status-whoring of the droves of QUANGO and international civil servants who, like the missionaries 100 years earlier, just need people’s lives to mess with and justify their jobs, and the gutless hacks such as Walter Russel Mead who make money by sucking up to any stupid idea the USG comes up with.

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17 responses to “Burma’s dead, long live Burma.

  1. SDL February 28, 2013 at 15:54

    See, the Cathedral’s ethnic policy doesn’t encourage ethnogenesis or discourage it either, it just freezes it on time, and then applies the equality principle. Kinda like their view of evolution. They’re not against it, they just want it to stop. Now. Retroactively if possible.

    Bravo. I’m still laughing.

  2. thrasymachus33308 February 28, 2013 at 16:12

    There will be years, maybe decades of bloodshed in Burma for all this.

  3. john February 28, 2013 at 18:58

    The West feels no qualms to intervene all over the world. Libya, Syria, Burma are but the latest examples. If there is some political points to score, we can turn an otherwise peaceful albeit repressive regime into years of war and strife. Come to think of it, Syria is really not that repressive. They happened to get in the way between the West and Iran. Millions displaced. It is all about geopolitics. All this human rights stuff is just a front. The West is not unique in what we do. I imagine anyone who is running the world will do the same thing.

    • RS February 28, 2013 at 20:27

      Sure, it’s just marginally better not to swamp your own head with lies. We will we will rock u sock u pick you up & drop u. If that is in fact what you are going to do. A little euphemism, a little idealism . . . but why have your brain go completely to mush.

      • john March 1, 2013 at 01:33

        The problem is that we need to hold one set of value publicly for members of our own society and another set for anyone who gets in our way. We can not publicly articulate the second set of values without contradicting the first set. We need to cloak the second set in some human rights thing which we selectively apply to the despot that we don’t like. All part of the burden of running the world. We even do this to our allies. Remember the “Freedom Fries”? That was when the French refuse to go along with our war on Iraq. Go read “Before the Dawn” by Nicholas Wade, it is all there. We do this since the dawn of human civilization.

  4. Nyk February 28, 2013 at 20:12

    Even Roddenberry’s communist Federation has a Prime Directive; of course, it doesn’t work in the leftist worldview because applying it would mean that someone is superior (i.e., the Federation) and the other is inferior.

    • Carl March 1, 2013 at 03:27

      The Prime Directive was violated in every episode of Star Trek where it was relevant. Similarly, the Cathedral places a high nominal value on “diversity” and yet relentlessly seeks to homogenize the world.

  5. Handle March 1, 2013 at 02:37

    Compare the recent official reaction to something like the coordinated attack against the embassy and assassination of Ambassador Stevens to the hysterical outrage surrounding the Allison Incident. John Moore Allison, American consul in Nanking, was “struck in the face by a Japanese soldier.” Headline from the New York Times, “Diplomat slapped by Tokyo Soldier”

    Such big news!

    This Allison incident was carried for three consecutive days in the New York Times from January 28 through 30, and also for three days in The Time of London on January 28,29 and 31 (January 30 was a press holiday).

    Thus, within the period that the “Nanjing Massacre”, an event which China currently compares to the Holocaust, was said to be taking place, reported as the major incident was this incident in which Consul Allison was struck: “For a period of about one week, this Allison incident was prominently reported on the radio news in London, Shanghai and Manila.” (The Nanjing Incident Viewed by a German Diplomat,pg.143)

  6. Nick Land March 1, 2013 at 03:12

    This is excellent analysis, although there’s room for some more sinophilia. You know how it works in that region: If you want an economy, and you’re not Japan or Korea, you better hope that Chinese people will run it for you. That’s the simple reality of the situation, isn’t it?

    As for WRMead — also a fascinating case. My question: Does he think that he’s being honest (and thus has extraordinary powers of self-delusion), or is he just a very superior type of hack? It’s amazing how much he sees clearly, before missing the dinosaur standing on his toes.

    • spandrell March 1, 2013 at 06:01

      Why would you want an economy if you don’t get the money?
      The way of having an economy in SEA is to get Chinese to move there, let them build an economy, then have a savage pogrom to show them who’s boss, and bully them into forgetting they’re Chinese. Thailand’s Phibun was the anti Lee Kuan Yew. Just as smart.

      Problem is today China takes care of their emigrants, so having Chinese in your country is standard imperial intervention.

      • The Slitty Eye March 1, 2013 at 08:19

        Inner SEA, upstream Mekong is already China’s turf, economically and politically. As early as 2008 when I was in the golden triangle area, Chinese influence already exerts in literally every aspects of social life there, from high profile casino, highway construction, rubber plantation, all sorts of daily , tourists, to small shopper, smugglers, and even desperados. Remind you that Burmese drug lord who executed dozen Chinese sailer two years ago was actually a Sichuanese-turned desperado in Burma. He sneaked into NE burma in 90s and became one of the biggest drug lord there. Of course those are off-record information that only circulated in that region, and you wouldn’t heard anything about it from the media.

  7. spandrell March 1, 2013 at 16:32

    “China is destined for centralized control with meritocracy. It used to control much bigger. It is not gonna collapse like the Russians, or the Yugoslavs. It is fundamentally different scenario”

    Blablabla

    Much bigger? When? The Qing was your territorial peak (besides the plantation economy the Mongols imposed for a while), and the Qing had no way near the control a modern state has.

    China is pretty decentralised as it is. It’ll devolve further. Meritocracy be damned.

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